Where you can donate to

Support the living

The number of consultations about child abuse has been increasing every year since statistics were taken. (In FY2012, the number was approximately 6 times the figure recorded in FY1999. )
This activity protects and supports children that have run away from child abuse or breakdown of the family or children that had no other means but to rely on the sex industry or gangster groups that wish to restart their lives.

Source: Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare “Measures Taken for Child Abuse – Current Problems and Future Perspectives” (FY2012)

Organizations that “Support the living”

  • Carillon Children Center
  • Wakakusa (Young Grass) Project

Message from supporters

What we need to do is to throw in the buoy

Atsuko Muraki
Former Vice Minister of Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare

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You often hear people say “Children these days haven’t gone through hardships”. However, child poverty rate has become a growing concern in Japan which illustrates how tough the current situation is for children. One out of seven children is suffering from poverty. The number of consultations about child abuse has reached 120,000 a year which is at its highest on record. The number of school bullying amounts to 320,000 cases.
Children who do not feel wanted at home or school run away from their home or wander about the city at nights. These children get labeled as “bad kids”. However, in reality, these are the children that are fighting a battle on their own. They too believe they should not be asking for help as they are doing things out of their own choice. Such children, especially girls, often get dragged into the sex industry or become victim to sexual offences. You may wonder why they go anywhere near such risks. However, often times, people involved in such industry turn out to be the first grown-up that had been nice to them.
Under the Japanese law, child welfare extends only to children below 18 years of age. Once the child is over 18, let alone over 20, there is very little public support she/he can rely on. Organizations are starting to support such children and youth, especially female. Won’t you join us in supporting such activities? The Wakakusa Project supports girls and young women that are struggling with their lives as well as other organizations providing similar support.
This is what one of the supporters said. “What is the point of preaching to someone who is drowning not to grab at a straw? What we need to do is to throw in a life buoy for them.”

Teenagers that do not have a place to stay tonight..

Setsuko Tsuboi
Lawyer

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“I was cursed at – ‘Give me the money you made from your part time job! Do more housework!” I ran away and slept on the bench in the park last night.” “They say ‘Study hard and get into a good school’ and watch and control every move I make. I would rather die..” “My mother’s lover touches me. I want to get out of there.”
A group of grown-ups who had no means to respond to such cries for help got together and started to walk towards their dream to create a shelter for children. In 2004, Carillon Children Center was established.
There are staffs that will stay together with the children for 24 hours and protect their living. There are lawyers assigned to each and every child to represent them individually. Once receiving notification of abuse, the Child Consultation Center copes with persons with parental authority and looks for a place for the child to go to. There are doctors and counsellors that take care of their mental and physical problems. There are volunteers that provide opportunities for recreation and learning. In addition, there are many citizens, organizations and corporations that are supporters. In 2011, we finally received authorization from the government and local authorities to operate under the Child Welfare Law as they recognized the need to create a shelter for children.
Placing the interest of the child in the center, we aim to form a scrum of collaboration between multiple agencies. Although there is no way of “solving” all the problems the child faces, we all make sure that he/she is not left alone and continue to embrace him/her for a month or two. After a while, the door to his/her heart which had been closed so firmly opens just a bit. You spot the little fire that says I want to live, I want to be loved. That is the moment of joy when you know that the child can survive whatever thorny path lies ahead.
During 15 years since establishment, more than 360 children used the shelter of Carillon. People that share our thoughts have opened shelters across Japan and have been supporting each other as they struggle with funding and shortage of staffs. All wishing that as many children as possible feel happy about their lives and in pursuit of their own happiness, start taking the next step..

Organizations that “Support the living”

Carillon Children Center

We operate “Shelter for children” as an emergency shelter for children that are not safe living at their homes due to problems such as being the victim of abuse. In addition, we also run “Home to support independent living” which is a home for children aiming to find jobs and live independently. We place the interest of the child in the center and provide support by forming a scrum of collaboration between lawyers, volunteers, Child Consultation Center and medical institutions.
[Use of donations]
Operational cost of “Carillon Kodomo no Ie (Home for Children)” which is an emergency shelter for children
web site >

Carillon Children Center

Wakakusa Project

The project started in 2016 with Jakucho Setouchi and Atsuko Muraki acting as representative promotors with the aim to support girls and young women in difficulties. Based on the concept of connecting, spreading and learning, its activities include consultation on LINE, operation of Wakakusa House, collaboration with corporations, organizing symposiums and seminar series and production of support manuals.
[Use of donations]
Operational cost of Wakakusa House which is a home for girls that are in need of rescue (started last autumn)
web site >

Wakakusa Project